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No Governing Body Has Our Self Interests at Mind | Jay Martin & Lynette Zang

Coffee with Lynette May 13, 2022

I’m so excited to have Jay Martin on today, who’s the CEO of Cambridge House and has posted some of the largest investment conferences in North America. Which gives him the opportunity of talking to some of the most important thought leaders from all over the world. Today we’re going to discuss civil discourse, personal sovereignty, precious metals, and the importance of community. I know all my viewers will enjoy this interview as much as I did. By the end of this video, you should understand the importance of having assets outside of the legacy system, as well as building a community for self-sustained sovereignty.

CHAPTERS:
0:00 Video Overview
1:45 The Motivation Behind the Business
10:52 Personal Sovereignty
26:48 The Importance of Community
33:32 The Great Reset
43:16 Counterparty Risk
55:42 Outro

TRANSCRIPT FROM VIDEO:

Lynette Zang:

I am so excited to have Jay Martin on today. He is the CEO of Cambridge House and has hosted some of the largest investment conferences in north America. This gives him a unique opportunity to talk to some of the most important thought leaders from all over the world. And I love that he has people on whether he agrees with them or disagrees with them, but to have that discourse, he’s the host of the Jay Martin show, a top-rated podcast, YouTube channel, and a weekly newsletter that discusses investment trends and psychology with 250,000 plus highly engaged listeners, viewers, and readers. Today, we got to talk about civil discourse and personal sovereignty, precious metals, and the importance of community. I know you’re gonna enjoy this interview. So without further ado here it is.

Lynette Zang:

Jay, t’s been great. I haven’t seen you since February and had a great time on your show and I’d like to really thank you for coming here today.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. It’s my absolute pleasure. Lynette. I’m looking forward to chatting with you.

Lynette Zang:

Well, you know, you’re very accomplished and I’d like to start by asking what motivates you to have built the business that you’ve built and to do what you do?

Jay Martin:

Oh, cool. Well, a few things. I mean, I got three core reasons at home. They are one, three and five years old, so that definitely helps. Right? Yeah. And I’m really fortunate Lynette. Like I really love what I do, you know, I, every week I author my letter and it’s the highlight of my week, I get to, I treat my newsletter, like my backyard. I talk about whatever I wanna talk about. You know, I don’t have any rules, I don’t owe anybody, anything. It’s really just my creative space where I share thoughts on whatever current events or, you know, just honestly like social trends, anything that’s cash in my eye that I wanna share some thoughts on. And, and all of my content kind of reflects that, you know, the podcast, the YouTube channel, we’ve got a big event in Vancouver next week and it’s, it’s all based off like, it’s all very self-serving right. The content I create answers, the questions that I have, I mean, really at its core, to be honest with you

Lynette Zang:

And, and all of the seminars that you do, you know, really bring you and, and your work on your YouTube, etcetera really brings you in contact with global thought leaders on all of these different topics.

Jay Martin:

So it’s the best. Yeah, it’s absolutely absolutely the best.

Lynette Zang:

So I wanted to ask you, you did a recent tweet. “Gold was under a thousand in 2008, when bear Stearns collapsed as the crisis matured gold fell to 700.” You said that you couldn’t remember what happened next <laugh> so I thought let’s talk about that. Cause I do re <laugh>. I do remember that really, really well.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Well, yeah. I, I felt like teasing the market a little bit this morning. I mean, you know, it’s, it’s marked May 10th today, right? The sky is falling. Everything is falling. It’s not bolted down, it’s getting sold, right? Cash flows everywhere. And and you know, my favorite asset classes are where I gravitate towards in general, not just in times like this, I think we’re actually, you know, very similar. I’ve learned a lot of how I build my portfolio from yourself and a lot of your peers. Right.

Lynette Zang:

Oh, thank you. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>.

Jay Martin:

I’m heavyweight precious nets for reasons like this. Yes. But you know, we get so reactive in the market don’t we, especially in the Twitter, Twitter sphere, right? Oh yeah. We look at like day over day price changes and even week over week and really lose sight of like, what’s the time horizon though. Okay, sure. We’re down 10% today. Does it matter? What’s your time horizon? And even, even goal bugs with the, you know, most historically relevant asset class ever known to man, still sweat, the short term price swings. And it’s like, that’s funny, what are you doing here? Right. What’s the time horizon. Right. So yeah, it was a bit of a poke, you know, but I’m bullish obviously on the precious metal sector. So I felt like sharing that

Lynette Zang:

Well, and, and we should talk about that because a lot of times when people see gold drop and they go, oh, what they don’t realize is that’s a spot gold market. And with all of the other markets dropping, there are gonna be margin calls because so much of those stocks were bought on debt. And so when they fall below a threshold, then people are forced to sell in order to meet those margin calls. So, I love the time horizon because anything can happen short term, but longer term. That’s what you really have to look at. So what do you see? Yeah. We had the conversation, you know, where I know what I think gold is going to in terms of Fiat and ever so much higher than that. But what do you think about that?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Well, I love your price prediction. I think if I’m correct, it was it was 50,000 would be a fair valuation for ounce of gold. Right.

Lynette Zang:

Currently, currently,

Jay Martin:

Currently, currently there it is. Yeah. So, you know, where do I land on that? I think that’s my time horizon is long. Right. I own physical gold in my intention. So what’s my time horizon? Well, my end goal is to give it to my kids and I pass away. So that gives you some perspective on my time horizon, right? When it comes to the physical goal that I am acquiring and hopefully will acquire for the rest of my life. Right. It’s it’s a marathon for me, not a sprint. And I will continue to accumulate. Right. I buy more when the price drops, that’s good for me. Right. And it’s something that I hope to leave to my children one day. That’s the inheritance. So, you know, it’s funny though, because I’m an investor. I know what kind of investor I am. Right. I don’t get confused and think I’m a trader. I don’t think I’m a day trader. I don’t think I’m a swing trader, but the majority of financial media headlines are written for and by traders. And so they, they captivate even the investor audience and they think all these, you know, bipolar headlines matter when they don’t right. But it’s really easy to fall victim and get so reactive. You know, I did an exercise a couple of months ago where I just compared the front page of like Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal, I think routers like day over day for like a 14 day period. And every day, you know, it’s a bull market or it’s a bear market. Like it’s just guys come on. Like, let’s just be realistic here. Right. And I get it right. Media’s there to get you excited and click on that headline.

Jay Martin:

They’re gonna do their job. But the investors of us, you know, I think we really serve ourselves if we’re able to police those emotions, like police them well and immunize ourself from those day to day, you know, hyperbole, sensational driven headlines and just re-center, like what’s the core focus here. Right. And you know, if you’re playing the precious metals market, like I am, yeah. I own physical and I own a ton of gold equities. And if I love the management teams of the companies that I’m buying, then that means that I trust them to weather the worst of storms. And if I’ve made that decision correctly, then events like we’re experiencing this week, don’t make me lose sleep because I put my money behind who I believe are the top performing entrepreneurs in the precious metals business. And I trust them to have the experience and expertise to surround themselves other great individuals to weather these kind of storms that have come out on top and time and time again, that’s proven. Correct.

Lynette Zang:

And you know, that, that is a really good strategy because what you’ve really done too, between the physical and the intangible is you’ve created a truly diversified portfolio and, you know, Wall Street, I mean, we’ve been trained short termism, right. I mean, you can’t, you can’t hold your attention for 15 seconds. Yeah. And so I think that we’ve really been taught to, to focus on the short term because wall street makes more money. If you keep trading, you know.

Jay Martin:

A hundred percent, a hundred percent

Lynette Zang:

And especially when so many in the world were given money during the, you know, pandemic. And so they were home and what did they do? They traded, and now those trades seem to be unraveling because they weren’t value based. And they weren’t long term. It was just all of this short termism.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. And that’s really systemic, isn’t it? Through our culture, whether you’re looking at the media platforms that captivate us, you know, it’s swipe culture, right. It’s like, I want it now it’s on demand culture. I also wanna be rich today, by the way, you know what I mean? And, and so how can I do that? Well, I have to catch the right trade. Right? Traders always get wiped out. Right. It’s it is like maybe 0.01% that outperform the market over time. It’s very, very small. And and you know, their names. Right? So that’s why I tell people before you start allocating cash to the market, the first step should be how much time do you have to invest in being an investor, right? Because if you have a nine to five or you run a small business, you got a family, all this stuff, like how much time you actually have to focus on your portfolio? Because if it’s two hours a day, don’t try to day trade. First of all, my advice never try to day trade. But if you want to, like, it’s a full-time gig and you have to really apply yourself and, and be, you know, there’s a lot to learn. It’s a lot to learn, right. I have about two hours a day, that’s it for my portfolio. And then my data runs away. Right. I want a small business. I got, you know, a hundred things going on the early morning though, or that’s my sacred market time. And I can look at the decisions I’ve made, you know, feel good about where I’m at. Look for opportunities, all this stuff, you know, cover some headlines. But after that, I’m away. And so as a consequence, I’m in positions for, you know, six months at minimum, five years is not unusual.

Lynette Zang:

Oh, well, for me, they can be even way longer than that. Cause there are foundational positions that you have in your portfolio. And those, like you said earlier, you know, you’ve got some physical gold that you intend to leave to your children. That’s a very long term time horizon and so appropriate because physical gold is one of the legs of dynastic wealth. That’s wealth that lasts in families at least 300 years.

Jay Martin:

Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

So it enables you to weather, all of these things that we’re going in and it kind of takes you or takes us to, are really key for you, which is that I’d like you to really address is your personal sovereignty.

Jay Martin:

Sure. I mean, you know, that’s the, that’s the core purpose behind all the content I create Lynette it is what drives my portfolio. And honestly what we call, you know, our, our epic family blueprint that my wife and I have created for, you know, our kids and our, our parenting mission. Right. And I guess it’s, it’s an understanding that nobody has your back and that’s a good thing because it puts you in the driver’s seat. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> as long as you’re willing to put the work in. Right. But you have to take care of yourself and this expands beyond wealth, by the way, we could talk about my portfolio. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> I included, my refrigerator on my pantry, right. The food that’s in there. Right. We’re not trusting what the FDA says and that’s not to say they’re crux. It’s just, it’s managing it too. <Laugh> we could talk about that. <Laugh>

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. We could talk about

Jay Martin:

It’s it’s an unrealistic expectation to think any governing body could have all of our best interest in mind when it comes to food, water, wealth, health, it doesn’t matter. Right. It’s unrealistic. So don’t don’t think that that’s gonna be the case. It’s the fool’s game. Right? You’ve gotta take control. You’re alone here. Right? That’s great news because it puts you in the driver’s seat. So when it comes to wealth, I mean, that’s why for me, it starts with gold and silver, because what that does for me, Lynette is like, it gives me confidence, right? Financial confidence. Same as you know, I train martial arts. I’m not an aggressive person and I never go. I’ve never been the kind of go pick a fight. But I like knowing that I’m good in a crisis mm-hmm <affirmative> if ever it should happen. Right. I just like having that confidence, I think clear, right? It’s that abundant mindset, you know, I’m, I’m more proactive. I’m nicer to people, right? I’m more patient, all this stuff. If I just feel comfortable, like I’m good. They’re being an idiot. Doesn’t matter. I’m good. I know I’m good. Right. And I want to feel that way about my bank account. And that starts with that historic store of value, which is gold and silver. It’s that, you know, it’s that FU money so to speak. It’s that, that confidence that just sits there and it’s like, I know I’m good. Right. That chaos might happen out there, idiots over there, but I’m good. I’m good. And I know I’m good. Right. And, and from there you can make far better decisions. Right? Thinking long term, not thinking reactive, not responding to whatever happened today because you know, like let everybody else get busy. Right, right. It’s it’s not like that for me. Yeah,

Lynette Zang:

Exactly. You don’t have to worry about the gold in your portfolio. It’s never gonna go to zero because it’s got the broadest base of buyer and that that’s something that I try and explain to people and you don’t hear heard enough in my opinion, but when you’re looking at Fiat money and Fiat money assets, which are government based monies and government, that debt based assets, you know, historically they always go to zero a hundred percent of the time. So, you know, I’m not insane. Well, some might think I’m a little insane, but generally speaking, you know, I’m not gonna do the same thing and expect different results. Right. And that kind of seems to be a lot of what’s going on.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Yeah. It’s it’s any student of history. I don’t understand how you could be any student history and not put some gold in a, in a it’s somewhere. You know what I mean? And you know, recently, and maybe you can relate to this. I have a lot of friends who don’t understand why I would own physical gold. Like, what’s the point, right? This is this an archaic rock. It’s served a purpose at one time, but that time has passed. Right. And it’s like, well, what the? <Laugh>, what are you talking about? Right. Like this is it it’s, I don’t, I don’t understand how you can study, study any market cycles, any currency cycles, the rise and fall of any empires. Right. And, and not wanna have that steadfast. And it’s the insurance policy. Like I don’t, to be honest with you, Lynette is gold, gonna hit $50,000 in my lifetime? It’d be lovely. But I don’t know. And if it doesn’t, it honestly doesn’t matter. That’s the way I approach it. Right? Cause what I buy with the gold is that psychological benefit. Right? It’s that, that confidence, that sovereign mindset. Exactly. And that’s worth every penny,

Lynette Zang:

Honestly, it could go to a trillion dollars, but when it goes to the $50,000, when it goes to a trillion, it’s because there’s absolutely zero value in the currency, in the barter. But here’s the beauty part about it. You know, originally in my strategy, I love that you have a strategy and that you bring your wife and your kids into that strategy. I mean, I think that’s critical, but you know, I used to think that when we get to the other side of this and there’s a component of gold in the new currency to generate confidence in the currency again, cuz that’s what always happens that I would convert a lot of my holdings into the new currency. But as we’re going to CBDCs central bank, digital currencies, I kind of feel differently about that. What do you, what’s your opinion on CBDC’s? Let’s talk about that a little bit.

Jay Martin:

I think, I think we’re likely to end up in a scenario where that’s the unit of transaction and you’d be a fool to think it’s a store of wealth. But if you wanna engage in, you know, day to day commerce that you’re, you know, go out for dinner, whatever hit the grocery store, you’re going to use whatever currency that economy supports, right? Whatever country you’re in, whatever that is. And you may have to exchange your wealth for that currency. But I would be very, very careful the same is I own cryptocurrency. Idon’t store wealth there. Right. Mm-hmm <affirmative> like I I’ve speculated in that market because like anybody, I watch the market activity and decided I wanted a horse in that race, you know what I mean? Mm-Hmm, <affirmative>, I’m not leaving wealth there. Not at all. Right. And if I make money in the market, I don’t leave it. And I, I invest in early stage. Right. So like I have sort of…barbell approach of super secure hard assets over here, many gold and real estate. And over here, I like the early stage equities and that’s the precious metals, explorers, developers, and minors. And if I’m generating profits on the early stage equities side, I’m gonna leave it there. Right. I peel those profits out and contribute that to my war chest, the hard assets. Right. And so that’s the foundation. Right. And whatever currency our local economy is using on a transaction basis. Fine. No worries. Right. But I think as I understand it today, that’s how I would approach that because what is a, CBDC probably gonna be a surveillance tool that, that also functions as a unit of exchange. Right. So, okay. Well that’s fine. Right. But would I maybe wanna limit my exposure to that surveillance tool maybe, right. Yeah. Probably, you know, what’s the counterparty risk to that unit. Right. And, and who holds it right. That’s deeply concerning. And we just watched U.S. And Europe confiscate 600 billion of USD reserves, like did that not send a message to every central bank in the world that said your, your money’s not as safe as you thought it was. That was unprecedented. And is it unwarranted? Not gonna comment on that. It’s a hot war. Right. All bets you’re off, but you know, the new precedent as if the U.S. decides you’re a bad actor at their own discretion. Right. That money’ no good. It just, you know what I mean? And I don’t think you and I are any different, to be honest with you.

Lynette Zang:

No. Well, Canada just did something similar to that. Not that long ago with the trucker strike.

Jay Martin:

You’re absolutely right. And that is like, that is horrifying because.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah, it is,

Jay Martin:

You know, they, they could do some deep dives and maybe uncover some nefarious actors and all this stuff. But what about the, the 18 year old? Who’s a bit rebellious. Like we all were who decided that’s a cause I wanna get behind. And they sent a hundred bucks, you know, as a donation, their account got frozen and now they’re, they’re on a list. Right. And they were just growing up, they were just caught up, you know, and it’s, and they’ve been bundled and labeled and punished and it’s horrifying. Right. That’s, that’s a very strong message that everybody should be paying attention to.

Lynette Zang:

Exactly. So it’s easy for, to look at and go that’s at the country level. Oh, that couldn’t happen. But you know, Canada is such a close neighbor to America, the U.S. Rather, and yeah. You know, and we just saw it on an individual level and it’s kind of hard to get a lot of data, have they say that those accounts have been on frozen, but I’m also hearing that a lot of it has not worked back through the system for that the people have access to their.

Jay Martin:

And, and just as importantly, like we tend to look at those as static events, right? Oh, that’s something that happened on that day. It’s, it’s always precedent. Right. It’s always part of a trajectory. So what direction is that trajectory moving? Cause next time it’s gonna require less of an event. Right. Once precedent set, same as, U.S. and Europe confiscating that 600 billion. That was just like, it’s always, it’s hardest the first time, the first time easier, the second time

Lynette Zang:

And QE. Right? That was the first time that they started doing that. That was the hardest time now it’s, it’s become a normal monetary policy tool except it doesn’t work.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Yeah. We make the mistake of asking, like what just happened instead of what’s gonna happen next, right? Like what is this, the stepping stone to? because it’s always a stepping stone to something, right. What is it a stepping stone to this first action that we’re watching right now? Right. What, what doors do it? Does it open?

Lynette Zang:

So what, what do you think it’s a stepping stone to?

Jay Martin:

I think more government intervention in our private lives? I mean, that’s as a Canadian, like I, I, like I said, the scariest part about that to me was like, you know, it was wrong for a handful of reasons, but I kept on thinking about my friends who have 16 and 17 year old kids who, who got wrapped up in this and, and donated some cash cause they were like, hell yeah, I wanna get behind. Right. The working man, right. The blue collar worker of this country. Right. Which is something I think was amazing. And, and it, you know, nothing by the way, Canada really makes

Lynette Zang:

Headlines. Was it nothing that they did was actually a lead? No, no,

Jay Martin:

No. That’s first lot. No. Yeah. No, no, no. But yeah, it’ll be, it’ll be interesting to watch how this folds, how, how it plays out. I mean, I’ve never seen Canada become so United simultaneously divided, but like it was one of the most unifying events that I’ve witnessed as a Canadian in the last 30 plus years.

Lynette Zang:

Can you talk about that a little bit more deeply? How did it unify, unify everybody? How did it help the knowledge base of people? I mean, did it wake people up and what, what are you seeing?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Okay. So I, I should preface that by saying it, I think it unified a massive population who suddenly felt the pain. Right. And, and could rally behind this movement that was making headlines all over the world. Right. That, you know, a core industry of Canada’s economy was taking the stand and this wasn’t some financial elite. This was, you know, the blue collar behind the scenes worker. Right. Mm-hmm, <affirmative> simultaneously Lynette. Like as you could imagine, it also divided the country simultaneously because everything divides these days. It’s like, as soon as an event happens, we’re supposed to pick a team. Right. Right. This or that. Right. But you know, it was like, this is gonna sound silly. But there were moments where I was walking down the street during that convoy when it was headed to Ottawa and when it landed and the sentiment on the sidewalk was similar to the 2010 winter Olympics that we hosted in, in Canada, in Vancouver. Right. And I say that to mean, like there were Canadian flags everywhere when a flag would drive past the sidewalk that people in the sidewalk would cheer. Like there was community and enthusiasm at a level that was like reminiscent of when we hosted the Olympics. And it’s funny that it took an event like this, but yeah, numerous times I’ll be walking down the street and just watch these eruptions of applause and support, you know, from people that didn’t know each other that were bonding together over something that they, they felt a certain way abouts and, and it was neat to watch.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. I bet you, that had to have scared the government though.

Jay Martin:

Well, I would say it for sure. Did. I mean, it was, you know, a week later that all these mandates dropped in Canada and the establishment claims, there was no relationship. Okay. There was just coincidence then <laugh> like a week later?

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. Well Jay, how many coincidences does it take until you realize it’s not a coincidence. Yeah. I mean crisis after crisis, after crisis to keep people off balance, is it a coincidence?

Jay Martin:

Right?

Lynette Zang:

I’ll let everybody out there decide. Yeah. You know, I know what I think. I don’t think there’s that many coincidence, but it goes back to your personal sovereignty, doesn’t it?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. I believe so. It’s, it’s it’s a, it’s a peaceful approach, you know, I think to understand that it’s just, you like, it’s, it it’s very important. Like, so when I talk about my, my, my parenting blueprint, for example, that my wife and I put together, right. We talk about like, what are the core values? If where you succeed as parents, what are the values that our kids have that we’ve instilled upon them? And, you know, creativity is number one, it’s an asset that’ll thrive in any economy situation, right? Confidence. Because without confidence, you may never put that creativity into the world. Number three is resilience, resilience, as it means, as it, as we translated is the relationship between hard work and reward, right? How do you understand suffering with purpose? Right? The importance of doing hard things. And so we landed on resilience for that. And then, you know, my, the fourth would be, would be giving back, right. Paying it forward if we’ve been fortunate enough to succeed in this life. But you know, all of that, I think it, I hope we hope it sets you up, right. To carve your own path without any reliance or independence. Because if you’re running a surplus, if you succeed financially, then, then you can give back to whoever you want to. Right. If you’re running a deficit and you’re dependent, you don’t have a choice. You know what I mean? Right. And yeah.

Lynette Zang:

Well, those are great core values, and I really admired you before. But after hearing this, I admire you so much more because it’s not just for your children, but it’s also for all of us. And I if you were here, you would know this, but creativity to me is the key as well, because it’s the, it enables you to solve any problem. There are no problems. There are just opportunities to come up with another solution so that you keep going and we’re facing something that is really massive because, well, I don’t know how you feel about it. So you can, you know, you, you can, you don’t always have to agree with me. Right? Sure. But there’s not one doubt in my mind. And also it’s out there all the time. I’ve been talking about a reset since 2009, when Christine Lagard had a Bloomberg interview, it was probably a half an hour interview. And she probably used the word reset. We have to reset this. We have to reset that at least 27 times and they’ve subsequently taken it down. But you know, really, I think it’s critical for us to be creative because we’ve got these problems that are not going to go away because there’s an agenda to drive us into a big enough crisis so that they can push this next thing down our throats and remain in power. Right? But that also takes us to, I think, another very important core value that you mentioned to, and that’s the community part and the paying it forward. And I’d like you to expound on that because I know that you’re part of a very, or you support a very important cause. And it’s even bigger than that. So I’m gonna let you talk about it though.

Jay Martin:

Oh, that’s cool. You’re referring to zero ceiling. I believe I

Lynette Zang:

Am.

Jay Martin:

That’s. That’s awesome. Thanks for bringing that up, but it’s so yeah, it’s, it’s a super cool initiative, actually local right? In, in the town where I live, I live 45 minutes north of Vancouver in little town called Squamish and, and zero sailing. Their mission is to end youth homelessness. The way they do this is by giving at risk urban youth, the opportunity to relocate to beautiful wilderness areas. Then they buy them with just positive influences in their life. You know, I’m really fortunate when that, and then I get to connect with people like you, I get to connect with all the keynote speakers at my conferences. Mm-Hmm, <affirmative> all the guests on my podcast. You know, a common thread that I pick up on all the successful individuals that I get the honor of speaking to is that they wanna pay it forward.

Jay Martin:

Right. Mm-hmm <affirmative> they recognize that they were mentored or they were counseled or advised, or had a positive influence somewhere along the way. And so once they’ve quote unquote made it, you know, they wanna give it back, right. They wanna pay it down to the next generation. And so I’ve been watching this and wondering, you know, what, what kind of like pairing could I make, right? Between, you know, my network of, of successful individuals and, you know, a generation that maybe could use some council, right. Specifically like an underserved population in urban centers. Right. And, you know, I was really lucky at 18. I, I left Vancouver, moved to a town of 42 people, literally 42, and <laugh> lots of wild animals, very few human beings. And, and the natural habitat was just such a blessing to me cause I was, oh, it is, you know, I had a lot of misspent energy when I was in youth, you know, and, and and made some poor choices and getting the opportunity to relocate myself, just randomly to you know, a very, you know remote wild environment was just a huge blessing and allowed me to like think outside the box, most importantly, right. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>, mm-hmm, <affirmative> like, I grew up with all these rules right. In, in the city, you know, here’s how life is, here’s what life should be. Here’s, here’s morality, here’s ethics, here’s law, all of this stuff. Right. Here’s what relationships are, all of this. And, and then, you know, separating myself from that, you realize all these rules are imaginary. They were just created by somebody else just like me. So why am I believing them to be gospel when they’re not right. It’s just, it’s just foolishness. And so anyways, all that to say, if I could find a way to give that gift, the gift of, of, you know, wild places with the gift of mentorship, you know, it just struck me as a good cause that I could do off the side of my desk. And that’s when I found zero ceiling, who’s doing half of that work already. Right. They’re taking, they’re taking kids out of urban centers, creating tough situations. I mean, all of us were pushed to a brink of some kind right during, during the last two years. Oh yeah. Lots of stress unpredictability, you know, so, and I’m in a pretty good spot and I felt myself push to the brink. Right. So my Brink’s different, but that 15 year old kid who’s already homeless. I mean, their Brink’s a lot different than mine. And so you could imagine some of the scenarios that, that unfolded over the last two years. And so yeah. To play a role in that org, we donate all of our YouTube ad revenue to that organization and help, you know, facilitate more housing and employment training, most importantly. And, and just, you know, a lot of counseling right. In therapy, just a lot of trauma. Right. So, but it’s a, it’s a route organization. Yeah. Super, super blessed to be part of

Lynette Zang:

That. So is it, is it throughout Canada? Is it in America? Is it anywhere else? Cause that sounds like a phenomenal cause. And I work with CFLA, which is it. Doesn’t take them out of the home. We, we put them in the country, but again, it’s definitely high risk youth and that’s our future. I mean, our future is the youth.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Yeah. Zero Ceiling, super local, you know, I decided to sort of cut my teeth in the philanthropic world with this organization because when I approached them and I said, you know, I’d like to contribute in a little, in a certain way. And what I want exchange is utter transparency into the organization. Right. I wanna know exactly how you operate, how the money’s spent, you know, who the employees are, what happens to the kids post program, right. Who gets in, who doesn’t get in all of this stuff because it’s not my world, you know? And I don’t, I don’t I don’t specialize in non-profits at all or social work for that matter. And so, right. You know, why Zero Ceiling struck me as like, wow, you’re just like a really small group of incredibly hardworking and passionate individuals doing some of the most important work on the planet. And and I, yeah, if I can just play a role here and then get full transparency and understand what the main pain points are. Right. And you bring some capitalism to the non-profit sector, I dunno. But you know, down the road, we’ll see what happens there.

Lynette Zang:

Well, it seems to me like what you’re really talking about here is Community. And I think that of the mantra, you know, my personal mantra, Food, Water, Energy, Security, Barterability, Wealth Preservation, Community, and Shelter. Yes. Community is probably or arguably I’d say the most important piece of it. And that’s what you do with actually I think pretty much all of your work, right? All the, you know, all the symposiums that you put together and the people that you talk to, isn’t that building Community?

Jay Martin:

Absolutely. Yeah. We, we, we build the tribe, you know, and it it’s lacking, isn’t it Lynette like it’s it’s funny, right? Like, you know, I live in a great neighborhood, good neighbors, young kids, my kids age. Great, great bond, all this stuff. And I, I do feel that we have a bit of a village concept, which I love so much. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> simultaneously, if I was hit by a bus tomorrow, was anybody gonna step up and take care of my family? Probably not. Right. Right. Probably not. So I have to pay a third party. Right. Every month I send them some money. Is it just in case I get hit by a bus? Right. Like how, how alien is that right. That that’s where we’re at. And I get it right. It’s, it’s it’s necessary. But you know, it, it speaks to the disconnect on a human to human basis right now that I, I ship money off on a monthly basis to some third party organization that I don’t owe anybody at. Right. So that my family’s taken care of if I get smoked out. Right. And trust me that the bigger insurance policy is, is in a safe somewhere, but <laugh>, but you’re right. Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

But let’s, let’s kind of expand that because I mean, do you agree, or you could disagree that we are, I mean, that we are inside of a currency while social economic and financial reset into a whole different system, you might not think so.

Jay Martin:

Social, economic and financial reset mm-hmm <affirmative> is that the question? Mm-Hmm <affirmative> yeah.

Lynette Zang:

Do you think, what, what do you think about that? Do you think that’s where we’re headed or what we’re already participating in?

Jay Martin:

I think on a social level, I’m seeing society break down in a lot of ways. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> and this manifests in just a complete and utter allergic reaction to civil discourse and tolerant debate civil divisions that are just irreparable. And so on social level, I would agree. I think that things break before they, they repair. I mean, you know, and I, I think we’re watching that right now, and it’s a, it’s a pretty hard thing to watch. I think that anybody watching this has experienced some strain on relationships maybe that they have never experienced before in the last two years cause everything became so polarizing, right? Yes, absolutely. And you you’re this team or that team mm-hmm <affirmative> and so, you know, is society breaking in a sense like, yeah, I’d say a hundred percent economic probably. Probably I don’t have as much clarity on that one. I think that, you know, if you just look at the decoupling between the financial markets and the real economy, you have to say, yeah, right. This isn’t working anymore. Right. And people are getting poor items are getting more expensive. Right. Like inflation’s starting to really pinch. Right. And we’ve been talking about it for a long time it’s happening now. Right. And you know, what’s the solution here because what do they say? There’s, there’s nine meals between civility and riots, right. Or nine meals between civility and anarchy. Right. That’s the line. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And you know, I I’m, that’s

Lynette Zang:

Not very many meals.

Jay Martin:

No, but you know, like yeah. A hundred percent.

Lynette Zang:

But people that are hungry and hopeless make choices, they would not otherwise make

Jay Martin:

The rules change based on your circumstance and you can’t fault anybody for it. Right. We’re gonna take care of ourselves and our families. Right. And, and I guess getting back to all those rules, they’re all imaginary. If they’re not working for you, you’re gonna make new ones, you know? And, and I guess I think of this decade, shorter answer to your question balance of it, the remainder of the 2020’s are gonna be like 2020s, have been, right. More chaos, more uncertainty. Right. And more civil unrest. And if we thought that the riots and protests in response to, you know, health mandates were big, just wait, right. The largest wheat exporters in the world, aren’t gonna be exporting any wheat and they’re not gonna be planting. There’s no seeding season, no harvest season. The product’s offline.

Lynette Zang:

Exactly. And that’s food.

Jay Martin:

That’s food, that’s food, right. That’s food. Yeah. I mean, we’re just, we’re just getting into it, I believe. And I don’t enjoy saying that and I hope I’m wrong. I just don’t, I don’t see it any other way. Right. We’re removing the product from the world global market.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. And I, you know, we’ve been taught, I mean, it used to be, people used to have victory gardens and that’s how they fed themselves. And I think we all need to have victory gardens again. Then that goes back to communities so people can come together. But the food is, it’s always too the single biggest issue as we go through these transitions. But now essentially the food supply is being cut off for most people. I mean, this is why I started, you know, my urban farm was because I knew that food was the single biggest issue for people as we go through these transitions. And I’ll tell you what, in March and April of 2020 in the last couple of years, I’ve been so thankful that I had planted all of these gardens, that I’m not a gardener. I don’t pretend to be. I am, I am a gentleman farmer cause I have other people that do the physical labor, but I understood the importance of it. And I, I don’t know how many people exactly that I can feed, but I can feed a whole lot more than, than just me or me and my family. You know? So yeah, the, the social fiber of the world is really shifting right now and has been.

Jay Martin:

Well. And we take a lot of things for granted, right?

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. Don’t we,

Jay Martin:

You know, maybe it’s unrealistic that in the Pacific Northwest I have right bananas 12 months of the year. Maybe that’s not a realistic expectation that I have. And I think a lot of these systems are being reset right. To your point.

Lynette Zang:

Yes, exactly. So what you’re talking about is eating with the seasons, right? You’ll grow it. That’s that’s actually I can’t say that I do that a hundred percent, but I could do it a hundred percent. I would say that I probably do that about 85 to 90% and I really that’s amazing. Yeah. Well, you know, when is the time to do something? It’s before you need it, it’s called preparation.

Jay Martin:

<Laugh> yeah. Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

You know, and the worst thing that happens, if you get fully prepared, Food, Eater, Energy, Security, Barterability, Wealth Preservation, Community and Shelter, that’s what you need. No matter what’s going on to have a reasonable standard of living as we go through this whole shift, you know, I mean, I’ll tell you the truth and I’d like to know your opinion of this, but the world economic forum and everything that they’re standing for in trying to push down our throats. Yeah. That’s a little troubling to me. <Laugh>

Jay Martin:

Right. Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

You will own nothing and be happy. What do you think about that?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I I’m, I’m trying to understand that concept to be honest Lynette, the whole, I guess idea, modern monetary theory. Right. And what this means and, and what it means in terms of like ownership over money. Right. Which I think is kind of at the core of it, as I’m beginning to understand this, I find it very complex and just foreign, philosophically different from how we think about transaction value and everything. But you know, that’s, that’s kind of at the core of it, right? You’re almost relinquishing your control and your ownership over money and units of exchange entirely

Lynette Zang:

And, and you know, and everything. I mean, if you buy your own house and you ultimately pay it off, well, Victorian times they always had the renewal post from the stairway was hollow and the part onto the top could come off. And when the mortgage was paid off that a huge party and they buried that mortgage, the paid off mortgage inside of that newel post. And then they glued the top back on. Huh. And so then that house could be passed down from generation to generation to generation. And so you had no mortgage and I can tell you in the neighborhood, because it’s an old neighborhood that I live in for Phoenix, not for many other parts of the world, but yeah, like this neighborhood was neighborhood was basically built in the twenties and thirties or mostly built. Okay. There are people in this neighborhood that have inherited this property from, from their grandparents, their parents, and now, so there’s three or more generations that have lived in that house. Okay. If you are a perpetual renter who gets to choose what that rent is? And I think what they’re really taking us back to are futile times where you just had one big landlord and that person owned everything and then everybody else worked for that person. So I think we’re coming full circle. That’s what I see. And that I think is what it’s about. You will own nothing, but somebody owns everything.

Jay Martin:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And, and the path between this and that is this, I guess, forward March to just a wider wealth gap. Yes. Wider spread poverty. Yes. Through inflation essentially. Right. You get people in a vulnerable enough state, you can do anything. If your promised and return is, will support you and provide for you. Right. Right. And this is in your best interest. This is the path towards stability. Right. Stability is a core…

Lynette Zang:

Who’s stability?

Jay Martin:

What’s that?

Lynette Zang:

Who’s stability.

Jay Martin:

Well, yeah. I think it’s it’s gonna be the PR message, right?

Lynette Zang:

It, that is exactly the PR I mean, what do you wanna own something for? Oh, it’s a pain in the neck when you wanna sell it and you have to yeah. Keep it up and Hey, if you’re renting, you can move whenever you want. Look at all of this freedom. Yeah. Don’t own anything own the experience except somebody owns everything.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Which is like, I mean, it’s just this massive push for me to double down on the sovereign mindset strategy becaus.

Lynette Zang:

Voila

Jay Martin:

And I just get back to like mental health. Right. You, I operate better. I make better decisions. I’m a kinder person. If I have options. Right. If I have options. Exactly. You know what I mean? And how do you retain optionality? Right. Well, number of ways, but you need some, some wealth off the grid, right. Something you own right there. Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

No counterparty risk. And what counterpart risk that really means. Can you explain counterparty risk? Cause I do get that question often enough. And I would like your explanation of what is counterparty risk.

Jay Martin:

Well, it’s, whoever’s holding the other side of the trade. That’s how I would explain it. Right. And so, you know, there’s zero counterparty, counterparty risk with an ounce of gold because that ounce of gold sits in Lynette’s desk. No one else has any claim to it. You can put it in your pocket, take it wherever you want. Right. And it’s your property. Right. And you know, there, aren’t very many alternative assets that retain that. I suppose you could the argument about real estate. But I think through, you couldn’t, I suppose just through basic taxation policy and

Lynette Zang:

Exactly.

Jay Martin:

And you know, what is true.

Lynette Zang:

And you can’t put a house in your pocket.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. A hundred percent

Lynette Zang:

Big.

Jay Martin:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s how do, how do you explain Lynette when somebody with zero expertise in the gold market and they don’t understand, right. If you, if you’ve never experienced anything, but the last 15-20 years, like there’s, it’s hard to understand the utility of owning. Right. And do you have a simple, simple lesson or a simple experience or a simple event that you point people to, to say, you don’t understand gold, consider this. Right. Is there?

Lynette Zang:

I, you know, I really, I come back to this all the time because I hear so few people ever talk about it and it does go back to the utility of this asset because it’s used in jewelry, making it’s used in the financial system it’s used in, in, in manufacturing, it’s used in electronics, it’s used in food. It’s used in every single area of the global economy. You hold it, you own it outright, but it has the broadest base of functionality and the broadest base of demand.

Jay Martin:

Hmm.

Lynette Zang:

Tell me of anything that, you know, that can claim that?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. Not nearly with as much diverse utility, right. To your point about just yeah. Storage, transportation, etcetera, zero counterparty, meaning there’s no other party with their fingers on that asset. There’s no other party that can manipulate that asset tax. That asset modify the price of that asset. The value I should say of that asset.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. Right. And it goes back to what we were talking about earlier with what the U.S. Did in the war with Russia and what Canada did in the war with the truckers. Yeah. Right. I mean, if everything you hold is counterparty risk, so it’s in the system. I mean, what do you do when the system says no?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. So, I mean, following that thread Lynette, like, are you seeing a shift right now from capital and energy and attention on the paper, gold market transition to the physical gold market. And I feel like I am, and maybe even starting with central banks, right. Repatriation of physical gold, right. Countries all over.

Lynette Zang:

Year. That’s right. That that’s been happening for a little while now, the repatriation and, and look at, let’s just talk about Russia for a minute because they had been divesting themselves from dollars and accumulating gold and the gold that they hold in their country, that’s theirs. And they’ve been utilizing that to get around all the sanctions, the gold that they held and the, and the reserves that they held outside of the country gone.

Jay Martin:

Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

To your point. Right? Yeah. So I mean, it really is simple. If you don’t hold it, you don’t own it. And a piece of paper that says you own X, Y, Z, no, no, no, no, no. What you have is you have a bunch of equity that can be used by whoever’s holding it

Jay Martin:

Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

For their benefit. And they can even use that same equity over if it’s done through the city of London. So hypothecation, and reation an unlimited number of times that same equity can be used. So going into the collapse, what do you end up with if that’s where your wealth is?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. A bunch of pieces of paper.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah.

Jay Martin:

Posters. So

Lynette Zang:

To your point earlier, too, I have hope because just like those people were cheering, the truckers and the movement and coming together more, this high inflation or the obviously high inflation is opening up a lot of people’s eyes, the heavy handedness of the global government. So I don’t think there’s any place that’s immune from that. I mean, Australia has been horrendous to their public. They all have, they’ve been usurping our freedoms, You know, my hope and what I think, I mean, what we have a shot at is enough people coming together and then saying, no, but you have to be independent. You made such a good point. What, what this does, what this does is it gives you choices.

Jay Martin:

Yeah. And that’s not a novel concept, is it? That’s a return to the norm. Right? We’re we, we kid ourselves with our suits and ties and fancy cars. We’re still just wild animals who grew up a little bit. <Laugh> that’s true. We’re not nearly as sophisticated as we like to think we are, you know? And, and it’s always been like that. And you know, it’s, it’s, it’s, it shouldn’t be a foreign concept to think that you have to take care of yourself. Right. It is up to you. Right. That’s the norm. That’s human beings. It’s what life is. Right. And also it’s good news. It’s not bad news. Right. I love that. It’s not bad news. It puts you in the driver’s seat. Right. You get to make the choices and life shouldn’t be easy. Right. Like it’s a, it’s a jungle out there. We’re just monkeys in here. Like try to make the best of it, you know, and roll up your sleeves and get to work. <Laugh>

Lynette Zang:

Absolutely, that’s such a good point. I mean, we, we are, we’re just, we’re doing the best that we can, but I love it when you’re independent and it’s all what you choose to do, then you’re driving your own ship. If somebody else is driving it, they’re gonna take you in their direction that they want you to go in. You need to be able to take yourself and your family and those people that you care about in the direction that you believe.

Jay Martin:

And I think there’s a way there’s an awakening occurring, right? Yes. And it’s, you know, I’m seeing this in the growth of channels like mine. Like why, why have, you know, why have, why has my audience grown the way it has over the last 18 months and a million of my peers, the exact same thing, right? Because yes, people are starting to ask questions. This doesn’t make sense. This doesn’t make sense. Why is this happening? Right. And there’s this, this thirst for knowledge about why the world functions the way it does and you know, pros and cons to that, right? It’s, it’s an abundance of people seeking out informative headlines. And you know, the media is not always great at informing people. It’s great distracting them and misleading them. Right. So

Lynette Zang:

That’s their job.

Jay Martin:

It is their job, right. It is absolutely right. And, and so I think you just have to be wary of that. Right. And like, I make a point and this frustrates the heck outta my audience sometimes to be honest with you, but I’ll have on guests that I agree with and guests that I disagree with and right. You know, my, my newsletter, like the core focus of it is to question everything and, and I don’t write it up for anybody but myself, you know, I, I write every week I write the letter that I need to read. You know what I mean? Like it’s, if I’m struggling with something, if I’m trying to understand something, I’ll write the letter about that. Or if I’m, if I’m feeling offended or triggered by something, I’ll write the letter about that. Cause it helps me flush it out or process it and if it helps other people awesome. But you know, it’s, it’s amazing how not taking a side can offend people these days. And it’s, you know, it’s like if you’re just trying to play the middle ground and understand things and hear both perspectives and, and weigh the options and, and try to remove blind spots, it’s, it’s offensive often to individuals who just want you to join a team. And you know, if there’s an economic, financial and social reset, there’s definitely a media reset occurring right now. That’s what I believe.

Lynette Zang:

Oh, you think so? I mean, you know, we’re, we’re supposed to be have freedom of speech, but yeah. There’s not a lot of that that’s happening. And we’ve even been put in a position where we have to self, I, I can, I don’t know about you, but for me, unfortunately, there are some things that I definitely do self censor, a hundred. I like to, but

Jay Martin:

Yeah.

Lynette Zang:

You know, I mean, if I wanna stay on air and be of value, then there are some things I just can’t really talk about.

Jay Martin:

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. We have a, a pre huddle on our YouTube interviews, certain buzz words, you just can’t say, you know, exactly. And

Lynette Zang:

That’s horrible that that really

Jay Martin:

Is the game.

Lynette Zang:

Yeah. We we’ve covered a lot of ground. I could keep going on and on, but is there anything that you feel we need to discuss here that the viewers need to be paying attention to? I know you have the event coming up, so I’d really like you to talk about that as well.

Jay Martin:

Certainly I can start with that. Thank you. By the way. And thanks for that. It’s it’s

Lynette Zang:

And all the links are below. So for anybody that, okay, it’s coming up really quickly though.

Jay Martin:

Next week. Yeah. Tuesday and Wednesday. It’s the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference. And this is like everything I do. It’s, it’s built to answer the questions that I have on that. And so love it. You know, individuals joining me on stage are, we’ve got the former prime minister of Canada, the 22nd prime minister of Canada, Stephen Harper the 63rd president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon, both of whom, the reason I wanted those two is they managed their country is through the 2008 financial crisis. The last time the whole world was wondering what’s the future of the U.S. Dollar, right? And so they were having those conversations with George Bush at that time and, you know, love or hit our politicians. They have unique perspectives on what’s occurring mm-hmm <affirmative> and any leader of a G7 or G20 nation is gonna have unique perspectives. So, you know, squaring off of those two individuals is gonna be a ton of fun. A handful of, you know, the, the macro thought leaders that I really lean on and a handful that I don’t, that I disagree with, right? Both from the inflation and deflation camps, right? Strong dollar week dollar camps. And, you know, my ambition with this event is to provide as much perspective, as many strategies as possible so that our audience can leave with just an abundance of ideas and then take from that, which works, which works for them, right? Because it’s, everyone’s got a different risk tolerance, investable capital time horizon, there’s no template, copy and paste strategy. It just doesn’t exist. So here as many perspectives as possible. And and then 230 junior mining companies on the floor. So if you’re looking at that market as, as I am, you know, it’s a great place to meet the CEOs before you let ’em have an adventure with your cash. You should always meet the management teams behind those small companies. And otherwise I’m at the Jay Martin Show, YouTube podcasts. I publish everything there, publish my weekly newsletter again. It’s the favorite thing that I do. And I just share thoughts on whatever is catching my attention.

Lynette Zang:

Well, I think we’re really lucky that you’re participating in this and I mean, this is a big collective way. I have a lot of respect and admiration for you, Jay. I really do.

Jay Martin:

I really appreciate that Lynette. It’s a two-way street, super grateful for this opportunity.

Lynette Zang:

Thank you so much. And thank you so much for being here and to all of the links are below. So if you can get to Vancouver on Tuesday, Wednesday, you should do it Tuesday, Wednesday, right?

Jay Martin:

Yeah. May 17th and 18th.

Lynette Zang:

That’s perfect. And until next we meet, please be safe out there. Bye-bye

Jay Martin:

Bye-Bye.

 

⬇️ Follow Jay Martin

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/cambridgehouseintl1/
Vancouver Resource Investment Conference: https://cambridgehouse.com/vancouver-resource-investment-conference
Cambridge House International Inc. http://cambridgehouse.com/
Zero Ceiling: https://zeroceiling.org/

Thumbnail Photo We believe that everyone deserves a properly developed strategy for financial safety.

Lynette Zang

Chief Market Analyst, ITM Trading

Sources & References In This Article

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